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Millennials and Integrative Medicine: Why the Connected Generation is Turning to Connected Health

Posted By Guest Post by Olivia Thomason, Friday, November 29, 2019

Disruptive technology has drastically changed the field of medicine and its practices. The generation that has grown alongside digital changes has introduced their own needs and preferences––which usually gives them a reputation as lazy and entitled. These millennials are often accused of being glued to their smartphones and computer screens. This stereotype leaves them as misunderstood––however, they may have a point. They are now the generation that comprises a large number of health professionals, doctors, and trainees, and their tech-savviness may be necessary in these changing times.

Take 
Blockchain which has been used as a tool to solve long-standing problems in the healthcare industry, such as wasteful spending and unnecessarily high costs among all stakeholders. This technology is predicted to continue breaking barriers in terms of sharing data more accurately and fostering a sense of transparency integral to healthcare. It is in a similar light that technology and advanced research has had an impact on integrative medicine as an emerging trend. Former president of the American College of Physicians Nitin Damle, M.D. has acknowledged that many doctors are pursuing new guidelines in terms of nonpharmacologic treatment as well. This shift has meant pushing the boundaries of everything that healthcare has to offer.

Best practices

Studies show that 37% of millennials believe that the American healthcare system is terrible, and profit-oriented instead of patient-oriented. They have condemned 
the dishonesty of Big Pharma and are disillusioned by the pharmaceutical industry. This belief and skepticism of institutions, together with their digital tools, is what has allowed them to seek out their own solutions in terms of healthcare. The paradigm several of them have instead subscribed to is one that is more focused on wellness––a holistic approach to physical and mental well-being. Integrative medicine is one of their answers to supplement their cause. It encourages healthcare practitioners to be active participants in the process of healing together with their patients. Physical symptoms are not the only factors acknowledged, but the mind, body, and spirit are given equal importance. Integrative medicine quite literally integrates conventional and alternative methods to facilitate healing.

The “Connected” generation

With this growing trend, 
Maryville University shares how the “C” generation is primed to make up the majority of the workforce by 2025, filling the void left by their retiring baby boomer parents. This connectedness allows them to do quick searches on symptoms, support groups for illnesses on social media, health fads, and especially with one another. Healthcare and wellness apps have sprouted out left and right to encourage meditation, heart rate monitoring, and sleep schedules. These integrative approaches are backed by science, which really is at the heart of the practice of medicine.

Do no harm

Wellness professional Stephanie Smith says that generational differences should never get in the way of healthcare. Regardless of age, all physicians take the same Hippocratic Oath that they will uphold ethical standards throughout their practice. While technology is likely to make changes for the better in healthcare, it should still be observed with a critical eye. It can, however, be the key to bridging the gap between generations of medical professionals, encourage collaboration, improved diagnoses, less invasive treatments, extensive research, and overall improved patient care. It is prevention that integrative medicine also advocates, after all.

 

 

 

 

Article written by Olivia Thomason

Olivia Thomason comes from a long line of doctors, so her parents were a little disappointed when she told them she wanted to be a writer. Still, growing up around medical books and discussions about her parents' most interesting patients instilled in her a love for all things medical science. Thankfully, she's discovered blogging as a way to marry her two great loves of writing and medical science together. These days, she blogs about the latest developments in medical technology, and she hopes someday to have enough experience to become a full-time columnist on a broadsheet newspaper.

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Tags:  best practices  Big Pharma  connected  do no harm  healthcare  integrative medicine  millennials  technology 

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Maximizing Health and Well-Being While Flying

Posted By Administration, Friday, March 4, 2011
Updated: Friday, April 18, 2014

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by Zina Kroner, DO

 As a nutritionally-oriented internist, I have seen air travel take quite a toll on the health and well-being of many of my friends and patients. With the excitement of traveling to a new destination, the new food, the change in schedule, the stress, the hassle; it is easy to neglect one’s health. My patients are frequently asking me for health travel advice. While practicing in a city where both business and leisure travel are staples in the lives of many of my patients, I have developed a nutritional and lifestyle plan to help optimize health while traveling.  

Drink 2 large glasses of water on an empty stomach in the morning of travel. This will hydrate you effectively. Have a high protein breakfast.  
 
Stress plays a significant role in air travel. Aside from a healthy diet, restorative sleep, regular exercise, and the addition of key nutritional supplements to the regime are helpful. One mineral that helps to combat stress is magnesium. It is one of the first nutrients to be depleted in the setting of stress. Your adrenal glands depend on magnesium, as do over 300 different enzyme reactions in the body. I recommend my patients take 100mg of magnesium-taurate the morning of the flight, and then another 100mg just before the flight.  
 
It is not uncommon for travelers to contract a respiratory infection, the flu, or other infection while flying. The poor air circulation in the cabin compounded by the proximity to other passengers who may potentially be sick poses a double threat. Those with weak sinuses are at a heightened risk, as well, due to the periodic changes in air pressure. Washing hands and using hand sanitizers in the plane may be of benefit. Hydration and optimal nutrition are integral components, as well. I recommend my patients take several key nutrients to help boost the immune system in the setting of travel. I recommend taking oleuropin before the flight, which is the active ingredient in the olive leaf that has potent antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties. In addition, beta 1,3 glucans and the prickly pear are cutting edge nutrients that I recommend that have been studied for their anti-microbial effects. Vitamin C and a combination of immune boosting mushrooms, such as cordyceps, reishi, and maitake, may help to prevent colds and other respiratory ailments in flight.
 
Boosting the immune system by addressing the gut is essential. It is an established fact that over sixty percent of the immune system is in the gut, referred to as the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). In addition to a healthy diet, intake of a probiotic (beneficial gastrointestinal flora) is imperative to optimizing function. I strongly recommend taking a probiotic a week before the date of travel and to continue for a week thereafter.  
Constipation is common in the setting of travel.  The change in food, regime, stress level, and diet are contributors to this phenomenon. Probiotics can help deal with this. Magnesium plays a crucial role as well, being that it is a muscle relaxor that can relax the muscles of the colon wall and therefore improve regularity. Hydration, exercise and healthy fiber intake are important as well.
 
It is not uncommon to get a muscle cramp during the flight. Magnesium, a natural muscle relaxer, can help to prevent this. Be careful, because what feels like a cramp may actually be a blood clot. I highly recommend taking natural supplements that improve circulation before the flight. Natural vitamin E and omega-3 fish oil have been shown to optimize the cardiovascular system. Their mild blood thinning effect may help to prevent a clot. I also recommend the use of nattokinase for clot prevention. There is a lot of research supporting nattokinase’s role as an anti-clotting agent. It is an enzyme extracted from natto, which is derived from fermented soybeans.  
 
To make it more user-friendly, I have put together all the supplements described above into prearranged packets. I have blended the highest quality nutrients into the “Flight Pack,” the only physician-grade supplement pack on the market used to optimize health and well-being while flying. I hope you find them helpful. Take one packet with a meal before your flight. Each Flight Pack contains 8 supplements. If it is okay with your physician, you can take this packet daily while traveling. Do not take if you are pregnant, are taking a blood thinner, have kidney or liver disease, or a bleeding disorder.  Living smarter, living longer… (The product can be ordered online at www.advanced-medicine.com.)

 

Tags:  health  prevention  technology 

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New Light Shed Upon "Environmentally Friendly" LEDs

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, February 15, 2011
Updated: Friday, April 18, 2014

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LED lights have been marketed as environmentally preferable alternatives to traditional light bulbs, but many contain lead, arsenic and a dozen other potentially hazardous substances, according to new research out of UC Irvine.

"LEDs are touted as the next generation of lighting," says Oladele Ogunseitan, chairman of UCI's Department of Population Health & Disease Prevention, in a university statement about his published research. "But as we try to find better products that do not deplete energy resources or contribute to global warming, we have to be vigilant about the toxicity hazards of those marketed as replacements." 

A light-emitting diode (LED) is a semiconductor light source that for years has been used as indicator lamps for aviation, automobiles and traffic signals. Amid concerns about global warming and the need for devices that are safer and use less energy, LEDs have increasingly replaced traditional bulbs that contain mercury. An expansion into the household market is currently under way.

For the research, Ogunseitan and fellow scientists at UCI and UC Davis crunched multicolored lightbulbs sold in Christmas strands; red, yellow and green traffic lights; and automobile headlights and brake lights. They then measured the contents and found differing levels of toxic materials, including lead and arsenic. 

Low-intensity red lights contained up to eight times the amount of lead allowed under California law. High-intensity, brighter bulbs had more contaminants than lower ones. White bulbs contained the least lead but had high levels of nickel.

Referring to the holiday lights in the January 2011 issue of Environmental Science & Technology, the team wrote, "We find the low-intensity red LEDs exhibit significant cancer and non-cancer potentials due to the high content of arsenic and lead." 

Results from the larger lighting products will be published later, but as Ogunseitan indicates, "It's more of the same."

Toxins like those Ogunseitan and his team found in LEDs have been linked to different cancers, neurological damage, kidney disease, hypertension, skin rashes and other illnesses. The copper used in some LEDs also poses an ecological threat to fish, rivers and lakes.

As of now, LED products are not classified as hazardous waste. Ogunseitan believes his research exposes a need for mandatory product-replacement testing, something that was never done as manufacturers put LEDs in products that replaced incandescent bulbs. 

As precautions, Ogunseitan advises refraining from throwing LEDs in landfills. He also recommends that crews dispatched to clean up vehicle collisions wear protective gear and that homeowners don gloves and masks when handling broken LED lights. 

You won't be overcome by cancer if you breathe the contents of a broken or cracked LED light, he notes. It'll just be one more toxin your body is exposed to on the road to the Big C.

Source: February 15, 2011. OC Weekly Blog. Coker, Mike. LED Lights, Like Incandescent Bulbs They Replace, Contain Toxins: UC Irvine Research. http://blogs.ocweekly.com/navelgazing/2011/02/oladele_ogunseitan_uci_led_lig.php

Tags:  technology 

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Are Cell Phones and WiFi Hazardous to Your Health?

Posted By Administration, Thursday, October 14, 2010
Updated: Friday, April 18, 2014

by Hyla Cass, MD  2675323741_b6ce302990_b

The latest form of environmental pollution -- and one that industry, government and wireless consumers don't like to acknowledge -- may be the most devastating threat to health yet: electromagnetic fields (EMFs). A few years ago, I was so concerned that I took a certification course in the detection and harmful effects of EMFs. What it taught me, above all, was how much the scientific community is learning daily, and how little we in the medical profession knew. This area was both frightening and daunting in its scope. I'm grateful that following Devra Davis's Disconnect: The Truth About Cell Phone Radiation we now have Zapped to educate the public on this serious issue.

The UK's BioInitiative Report of July 2007 (updated in 2009) describes hundreds of studies that link EMF exposure to Alzheimer's disease, ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease), brain fog, cardiovascular disease, miscarriage, infertility, insomnia, learning impairment, as well as anxiety and depression. Wireless technologies -- like cell and cordless phones -- produce microwaves that increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, leading to changes in brain chemistry. Even low-level EMFs can cause brain cells to leak. 

That's not all: Although actual tissue heating does not occur, EMFs also cause breaks in DNA, speed up cell division, disrupting the orderly process of chromosome matching and detaching, and activate stress protein or heat shock proteins. And as Anne Louise Gittleman writes in Zapped:

Most disturbing of all, the Swedish National Institute for Working Life found that people using cell phones for 2,000 hours -- a total most of us could easily rack up over the years -- had a 240 percent increased risk for malignant brain tumors on the side of the head where they usually held their phone.

So, what do we do to avoid these dangers? I'm relieved that Gittleman, my friend and colleague and author of over 30 bestselling books, has tackled this topic. We'll learn that most of us don't need to give up all the digital and electronic gadgets that make life so much easier. To protect ourselves, we first need to recognize the risks and then make smart choices in how we use all the available technological wonders.

 


Why Are EMFs So Dangerous?

What most people don't realize is the human body is naturally electrified. From the organic computer that is your brain, which sends out sensory messages like hunger and pain, to the energy that pumps your heart and makes your muscles contract, electricity powers your body. This innate electromagnetism within you is so critical to your daily functioning that modern medicine uses it in diagnostic testing (including electrocardiograms and MRIs) and, increasingly, to heal.

The "body electric" is an exquisitely tuned and sensitive creation, but unfortunately, human beings (and animals) respond favorably to only a very small range of electromagnetic frequencies. And there's a big difference between the body's natural electricity and the man-made electromagnetic frequencies that surround us 24/7 today. According to New York Times reporter B. Blake Levitt in Public Health SOS: 

Most living things are fantastically sensitive to vanishingly small EMF exposures. Living cells interpret such exposures as part of our normal cellular activities (think heartbeats, brainwaves, cell division itself, etc.) The problem is, man-made electromagnetic exposures aren't "normal." They are artifacts, with unusual intensities, signaling characteristics, pulsing patterns, and wave forms. And they can misdirect cells in myriad ways.

Some of this radiation -- extremely low frequency (ELF) radiation in power lines, the radio frequency (RF)/microwave range where all things wireless live, intermediate frequencies ("dirty electricity" or freaky frequencies linked to sick building syndrome), and the highest frequencies (gamma and X-rays) -- is more damaging than natural frequencies to which humans (and animals) have adapted over millennia. Today, most Americans are constantly exposed to artificial frequencies, given the rapidly escalating pace of microwave and wireless expansion.

The bottom line is that electropollution -- from cell towers, computers, cordless and mobile phones, PDAs, Wi-Fi, even the electrical appliances and wiring in our homes, offices and public buildings -- continuously disturbs the sympathetic nervous system. This, in turn, elevates the body's fight-and-flight response, raising levels of the stress hormone cortisol. Fluctuations in cortisol lead to a wide range of health concerns ranging from belly fat and thinning skin to accelerated aging, blood sugar imbalance, cardiovascular problems, erratic sleep patterns and mood disturbances. Dr. Stephen Sinatra elaborates on this issue in his new book, Earthing. 

Your body responds to EMFs as though they were public enemy number-one, triggering what two-time Nobel Prize nominee Robert Becker, M.D., in his 1998 book The Body Electric, called "subliminal stress." While intellectually you don't recognize this kind of stealth stress the way you would overwork or being stuck in traffic when you're late for an important appointment, your body's internal antennae pick up on it in several ways, according to the late scientist, Dr. W. R. Adey, from Loma Linda University:

  • The flow of blood and oxygen shuts down to all except major organs like the brain and heart.
  • Any systems -- including digestion and immunity -- that aren't necessary for fight or flight response are put on hold.
  • Blood pressure and heart rate as well as blood sugar levels increase to prepare your body for danger.

Recent research by Magda Havas, Ph.D., associate professor of Environmental and Resource Studies at Trent University in Canada, shows that dirty electricity -- EMFs in electrical wiring -- can raise blood sugar levels in diabetics and people at risk for diabetes. "Exposure to electromagnetic pollution in its various forms may account for higher plasma glucose levels and contribute to the misdiagnosis of diabetes," she writes. Dr. Havas' website is a goldmine of information on the entire topic of EMF pollution, as is Dr. Mercola's EMF site! 

Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity

There are "canaries in the coal mine" -- hypersensitive individuals who are severely weakened by EMFs, and find themselves marginalized by the medical profession and society in general. Some must live in areas far from cell towers, Wi-Fi and the like. On a cellular level, these individuals have measurable damage to the mitochondria, the energy factories in each cell, and require reparative nutrients, for starters. I recently heard from a concerned family member of a man who had been exposed over time to a cell tower beaming through his office window. Quite ill, he was nonetheless unwilling to move his office location as I suggested, and I didn't hear from them again. Ignoring the messenger, however, doesn't solve the problem.

Zap-Proof Your Children

Today, an estimated 31 millions kids are on their cell phones close to four hours a day. Mobile phone companies are even marketing phones to preschoolers. Gittleman writes:

The trouble is, kids absorb 50 percent more electropollution than adults. One study finds that a cell phone call lasting only two minutes can cause brain hyperactivity that lasts up to an hour in children. Because their skulls are smaller and thinner than adults, EMFs penetrate much deeper into children's brains. Kids' brains are also more conductive due to their higher water and ion concentration. 

The Toronto Board of Health recommends that children under eight use cell phones only for emergencies and that teens limit calls to under 10 minutes. If your kids have cell phones, encourage them to use the same smart tips you do.

Smart Use of Technology

The good news is most of us don't have to give up our smartphones if we use them wisely. Here are some of the many tips Gittleman highlights in Zapped: 

  • Text, don't talk, whenever possible.
  • Use speaker mode to keep your phone as far away from your head as possible.
  • Go offline -- turn off your cell phone when you're not using it and shut off your wireless router at night. (You'll be amazed how much more soundly you'll sleep.)
  • Get your phone out of the your pocket; men who carry their mobile there have lower sperm counts than those who don't carry a cell phone.
  • Avoid tight spaces (buses, elevators, trains, and subways) where your phone has to work harder to get a signal out through metal.
  • Buy low, choosing a phone with a low SAR (specific absorption rate) number.
  • Replace your cordless phones with corded land line phones.
  • Don't cradle your laptop--putting it on your lap exposes your reproductive organs to EMFs.
  • Most important of all, restrict cell and cordless phone use during pregnancy. Heavy phone use then has been linked to increased risk of miscarriage and birth defects. And a 2008 survey of more than 13,000 children found that those whose mothers used a cell phone during pregnancy were more likely to have behavior problems like hyperactivity and trouble controlling their emotions. 

Don't rely on the many stick-on devices available for your cell phone or computer that claim to protect you. Most are sold via network marketing, and I have yet to see the level of scientific proof that could convince me. You'll likely see comments to this blog, advertising them. Caveat emptor!

Even if you go back to wired technologies at home, Wi-Fi is expanding rapidly into schools and other public buildings. If the telecommunications industry has its way, we will all be bathed in a sea of artificial radiation from nonstop EMF exposure.

Due to their lobbying efforts, Section 704 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 makes state and local governments powerless to prohibit cell towers and wireless antennas based on "environmental (i.e., human) health concerns." Write your congressmen and senators to change this legislation and to require the FCC to reduce exposure guidelines for EMFs.

Don't wait for the government to protect you, though. Get your copy of Zapped and take action!

Tags:  technology 

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