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Getting the Perfect Job Pt. 2: Mastering the Interview

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Our three-part series to help you land the perfect job as an integrative practitioner continues with an in-depth look at interviewing. If you missed our first installment on finding a position and writing your resume, click here to read more.

As with most things in the healthcare field, the interview process is often structured in two parts, beginning with a phone interview and followed by an in-person interview. Both are very important in showing your employer who you are and why you are the best fit for the position. With the proper preparation, the interview becomes a simple step to your new career.

Pre-Interview Prep

  • Research your potential employer
    Research corporate culture, values, financial stability and potential growth. It will also help to understand the interview process.
  • Have references ready
    Have a minimum of three names with their titles, company, dates you worked for them, email and phone number ready. Learn how to get the most out of your references HERE.
  • Plan your route and attire
    Know how long it will take you to get to your interview and plan to arrive 10 minutes early. Clarify where you will need to meet your potential employer. A few days beforehand, be sure to check that your professional attire is clean, neat and pressed if needed.
  • Rehearse your answers
    Look into common interview questions and have your answers ready. View a few HERE with sample answers.
  • More ideas

The Phone Interview

  • Remove distractions
    Take the call in a quiet area with minimal distractions so you can focus and your interviewer can here you.
     
  • Be alert, attentive and ready to answer questions
    This is your first opportunity to show your employer who you are.
  • Take notes
    Write down the name and contact information of who you are talking to ask well as any information you feel is important concerning the position.
  • Be prepared to commit to a follow-up interview
    Have your calendar on hand to take advantage of the momentum of your interview.

The In-Person Interview

  • Be prompt and thorough
    Arrive 10 minutes early and bring extra copies of your resume (or CV) and reference contact information.
  • Use examples
    Use your experiences to your advantage. Consider preparing a list of your achievements, setbacks, positive & negative attributes, and professional goals to help you guide your discussion.
  • Remember your body language
    A little confidence goes a long way. Learn more about proper body language HERE
  • Ask questions
    Yes, interviews go both ways! You want to make sure the position is right for you. For some ideas, click HERE.

Or The Virtual Interview

  • Test your technology
    At least 30 minutes before your interview, test your computer, internet speed, the camera and mic. Is your picture grainy or any echos? Being caught off guard will throw you off your game and possibly cause them to question whether you are the right candidate for the job.

  • Set up your work station
    Find a room in your house with little distractions that is well lit. Make sure everything in the camera field of vision is clean. The best background is a blank wall.
  • Remember your body language
    Even if you are at your computer, still follow the tips from above. Sitting up straight and keeping your eye on the camera when talking is important.
  • Dress professionally
    Even though you are still at home, you should look professional to show you are serious about the position.

Follow Up

  • Write a thank you
    A hand-written note two days after your interview is ideal, though email will do if necessary. It provides an opportunity to show courtesy as well as emphasize your strengths and enthusiasm. Learn more about what to include HERE.

Additional Interview Questions and Tips from The Healthcare Initiative

Tags:  career  careers  health  healthcare  hunt  hunting  interview  job  medical  perfect  virtual 

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Millennials and Integrative Medicine: Why the Connected Generation is Turning to Connected Health

Posted By Guest Post by Olivia Thomason, Friday, November 29, 2019

Disruptive technology has drastically changed the field of medicine and its practices. The generation that has grown alongside digital changes has introduced their own needs and preferences––which usually gives them a reputation as lazy and entitled. These millennials are often accused of being glued to their smartphones and computer screens. This stereotype leaves them as misunderstood––however, they may have a point. They are now the generation that comprises a large number of health professionals, doctors, and trainees, and their tech-savviness may be necessary in these changing times.

Take 
Blockchain which has been used as a tool to solve long-standing problems in the healthcare industry, such as wasteful spending and unnecessarily high costs among all stakeholders. This technology is predicted to continue breaking barriers in terms of sharing data more accurately and fostering a sense of transparency integral to healthcare. It is in a similar light that technology and advanced research has had an impact on integrative medicine as an emerging trend. Former president of the American College of Physicians Nitin Damle, M.D. has acknowledged that many doctors are pursuing new guidelines in terms of nonpharmacologic treatment as well. This shift has meant pushing the boundaries of everything that healthcare has to offer.

Best practices

Studies show that 37% of millennials believe that the American healthcare system is terrible, and profit-oriented instead of patient-oriented. They have condemned 
the dishonesty of Big Pharma and are disillusioned by the pharmaceutical industry. This belief and skepticism of institutions, together with their digital tools, is what has allowed them to seek out their own solutions in terms of healthcare. The paradigm several of them have instead subscribed to is one that is more focused on wellness––a holistic approach to physical and mental well-being. Integrative medicine is one of their answers to supplement their cause. It encourages healthcare practitioners to be active participants in the process of healing together with their patients. Physical symptoms are not the only factors acknowledged, but the mind, body, and spirit are given equal importance. Integrative medicine quite literally integrates conventional and alternative methods to facilitate healing.

The “Connected” generation

With this growing trend, 
Maryville University shares how the “C” generation is primed to make up the majority of the workforce by 2025, filling the void left by their retiring baby boomer parents. This connectedness allows them to do quick searches on symptoms, support groups for illnesses on social media, health fads, and especially with one another. Healthcare and wellness apps have sprouted out left and right to encourage meditation, heart rate monitoring, and sleep schedules. These integrative approaches are backed by science, which really is at the heart of the practice of medicine.

Do no harm

Wellness professional Stephanie Smith says that generational differences should never get in the way of healthcare. Regardless of age, all physicians take the same Hippocratic Oath that they will uphold ethical standards throughout their practice. While technology is likely to make changes for the better in healthcare, it should still be observed with a critical eye. It can, however, be the key to bridging the gap between generations of medical professionals, encourage collaboration, improved diagnoses, less invasive treatments, extensive research, and overall improved patient care. It is prevention that integrative medicine also advocates, after all.

 

 

 

 

Article written by Olivia Thomason

Olivia Thomason comes from a long line of doctors, so her parents were a little disappointed when she told them she wanted to be a writer. Still, growing up around medical books and discussions about her parents' most interesting patients instilled in her a love for all things medical science. Thankfully, she's discovered blogging as a way to marry her two great loves of writing and medical science together. These days, she blogs about the latest developments in medical technology, and she hopes someday to have enough experience to become a full-time columnist on a broadsheet newspaper.

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Tags:  best practices  Big Pharma  connected  do no harm  healthcare  integrative medicine  millennials  technology 

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