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Shivering

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, February 9, 2010
Updated: Friday, April 18, 2014

As many parts of the United States endure a winter chill, researchers at the University of California, Davis, researchers have published noteworthy findings in the current Journal of Nutrition. Their study suggests increasing the current recommended vitamin D intake by at least a factor of five (5). The new study states that in order to achieve vitamin D sufficiency (i.e., at least 75 nm/liter), someone of European ancestry needs 1,300 IU of vitamin D a day. People of African descent require 2,100-3,100 IU daily. Many experts consider that 25(OH)D levels less than 50 nmol/liter indicate vitamin D deficiency.

2096907196_1e72a36290 A pooled analysis published in the British Medical Journal found that the combination of vitamin D and calcium reduced fractures by 8 percent and hip fractures by 16 percent.

The call by Bill Faloon of Life Extension Foundation to test hospital patients for vitamin D status grows in importance as vitamin D deficiency is linked to the following:

  • osteopenia and osteoporosis
  • muscle weakness and chronic pain
  • fractures
  • common cancers
  • autoimmune diseases including type I diabetes
  • infectious disease
  • cardiovascular or heart diseases

Of those aged 50-70 enrolled in a Chinese study, 94 percent tested vitamin D deficient. Vitamin D deficiency is also now linked to metabolic syndrome or insulin resistance. Given the approximately 2,900 studies published to date and the growing awareness of vitamin D deficiency among those who live in the United States, why no public-health action?

From ANH-USA. Published on January 26, 2010.

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