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Integrated Medicine for Neurologic Disorders

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, March 09, 2010
Updated: Friday, April 18, 2014

Imgres Integrated Medicine for Neurologic Disorders is a book which addresses herbal and holistic medicine for brain health and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Stroke, Migraine, and Seizures. This book can help patients and medical practitioners to integrate Western medicine with herbal and holistic medicine to reduce symptoms and slow disease progression.

Sheryl Shook, Ph.D., a physiology professor with a Ph.D. in neuroscience, co-authored the book with Dr. Sidney Kurn. They have combined their expertise to work in the community educating about improving health by integrating the benefits of mainstream medicine with the rich and valuable practices from many cultures that rely on plants, nutrition, and lifestyle for healing. 

“Keeping your body healthy is an expression of gratitude to the whole cosmos - the trees, the clouds, everything.” Thich Nhat Hanh 

As one of the oldest medical subspecialties, neurology has a long history of clinical observation and theoretical development. The extreme complexity and inaccessibility of the nervous system continues to challenge researchers, compared with the rapid, technological development of other specialties such as cardiology or nephrology. Until the last 20 years, even drug treatments were rather limited. Neurologists have witnessed a rapid growth in our pharmacopoeia, including drugs for disorders previously untreatable such as ALS and Alzheimer’s disease.

 Most exciting is the seminal breakthrough in seeing an underlying order involving a few abnormal processes that manifest variably as Parkinson’s disease in one patient, Alzheimer’s disease in another, and so on. Numerous articles report on studies revealing inflammation, excitotoxicity, oxidation, genetic predilection, nutrient deficiencies and environmental toxicity in the onset and development of neurologic disorders. Disorders as disparate as stroke and multiple sclerosis, share these underlying processes. The contribution of each process, the particular positive feedback loops, and particularly the genetic predilection appear to determine the particular disease in any one individual. Even the fields of neuroprotection and system theory, generally not part of mainstream neurology, are receiving attention with numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals (1). 

Unfortunately, despite these important developments in clinical neuroscience, patients continue to suffer the symptoms of neurologic illness. Our drugs are not as effective as we would like, illnesses continue to progress, and the chronicity of some diseases overwhelm our best efforts. As patients and clinicians, we are committed to being pragmatic, finding what works, even if usage is based on tradition without good double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. Large randomized trials are expensive, and for natural herbs and nutrients, do not necessarily lead to a patentable product. Numerous studies on supplements exist and appear regularly in peer-reviewed journals. Studies may not rise to the level of large randomized trials necessary for FDA approval. The absence of this type of evidence is not proof of lack of efficacy. In regards to toxicity, the long history of usage provides ample information, and new interactions are reported on a regular basis. The “gold standard” of clinical drug usage, the Physician’s Desk Reference (PDR), has its second addition on herbs and nutrients. The standard pharmacist’s reference on herbs, nutrients and their interactions has also been re-edited. These texts, plus innumerable Medline references help guide the judicious use of supplements in clinical practice, or, what I call, clinical supplementation.

 Integrated Neurology is the practice of neurology utilizing all appropriate measures to alleviate suffering in an individual patient with a neurologic disorder. This may involve drugs, herbs, nutrients, acupuncture and a large group of bodywork modalities. It is an “open system”, drawing information as needed from science, medicine and the more traditional healing arts. It is “evidence based”, from large randomized trials, millennial long traditional usage as well as anecdotal evidence. The principle of “do no harm”, applies to Integrated Neurology as it does to medicine in general. Even though herbs and nutrients are generally much less toxic than drugs, known side effects, toxicities and drug interactions exist and require careful consideration. Integratedneurology.net offers the reader an introduction to Integrated Neurology including basic principles, treatment suggestions, references and appropriate linkages. Feedback is welcome on the E-mail site. 

“The wisest mind has something yet to learn.”  George Santayana 

          - Sidney Kurn, MD

References:

1. Albergina L and Colangelo AM The modular systems biology approach to investigate the control of apoptosis in Alzheimer’s disease neurodegeneration. BMC Neurosci. 2006 Oct 30;7 Suppl 1:82 (Epub ahead of print)

Tags:  integrative medicine  neurology 

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